Ribbon-cutting Sunday at Forest Ridge Preserve – Cleveland.com

Ribbon-cutting Sunday at Forest Ridge Preserve – Cleveland.com

This is a wonderful, large natural area that was preserved through a partnership of Western Reserve Land Conservancy and Moreland Hills. If you have a chance, attending the ribbon-cutting and taking a hike would be a great adventure!

 

Upcoming Class- Living Rivers!

Living Rivers–Arteries of the Eastern Forest, August 16-21, 2009

A five day field course in aquatic ecology & the global significance of the Eastern Forest led by five outstanding field biologists; held at the Arc of Appalachia Preserve System in southern Ohio. David Johnson Microbiologist from Ohio Wesleyan; Greg Lipps, herpetologist; Roger F. Thoma, Eastern US crayfish expert; Mark Kibbey, Curator of Fishes, OSU Museum of Biodiversity; and G. Thomas Watters, freshwater mussels expert, Research Associate, OSU Museum of Biodiversity.

This course will further participants’ appreciation of the Eastern forest by studying its lifeblood — its rivers and streams, and the myriads of life forms that watersheds support. Experts in the fields of botany, mussels, crayfish, fish and salamanders will be leading this course – giving participants a global, cross-disciplinary foundation of knowledge. America’s Eastern Forest shares many tree and mammal genera with closely-related forest centers located in Europe and Eastern Asia. However, our native forest has one major feature that, when compared to its sister forests, distinguishes it globally. Quite simply, America’s Eastern temperate forest claims the highest aquatic life diversity in the temperate world.

Conservation challenges now make waterways one of the most imperiled of the forest’s components throughout the temperate world, so it behooves Eastern US citizens to gain knowledge quickly in this important realm. This course is suitable for any person interested in living systems, regardless of formal educational background and vocation. Limited to 16 participants. For full information: http://www.highlandssanctuary.org/WE/Waterways/waterways.htm

 

Appalachian Forest School in Southern Ohio

From a press release sent out by The Arc of Appalachia Preserve System:

Those of us living east of the Mississippi River all share something in common. We live within the primeval boundaries of what was once North America’s great temperate broadleaf forest. Only a few hundred years ago, this nearly unbroken forest cloaked the entire eastern third of the continent. Despite its size, for most citizens our native biome has become an “invisible forest,” fragmented from its original unified grandeur, and unrecognized as a living force in our daily lives.

The Arc of Appalachia Preserve System is encouraging Eastern citizens to awaken to their common forest heritage. Acknowledging our shared home in what was once among the world’s largest forests could help us connect more deeply with our native landscape, connect more strongly other forest stewards across multiple state lines, and anchor a more meaningful sense of place in the world.

To advance forest literacy among citizens, the non-profit Arc of Appalachia Preserve System of southern Ohio is sponsoring the new Appalachian Forest School, an institute offering 3-7 day long courses to be held at various locations within the historic range of the Eastern Forest. Each course includes an emphasis on global and national perspectives, and invites a cross-disciplinary understanding of the temperate forest biome in which the majority of U.S. citizens work and live. Instructors have been carefully selected from professors, field researchers, land managers, and naturalists — combining talents and specialties to present a broad and integrated view of the Eastern Forest. Even as disturbed as America’s Eastern forest is today, the second growth forest that remains in Eastern United States is the largest remnant temperate forest in the northern hemisphere, offering significant potential for ecological study and restoration.

The 2009 Course Schedule includes:

Forests of the Ozarks, “Life on the Edge,” May 26-June 1st.
Visit pine-oak woodlands and remnant old-growth forests on the interface of two major biomes — where the Eastern temperate forest meets the prairies of the Midwest. See the nation’s largest and cleanest spring-fed river systems, rich canebrake communities sheltering Swainson’s warblers, wild rarely-explored caves, collared lizards and other fascinating reptiles, and wet orchid-strewn glades in one of the largest forest wilderness areas left in Eastern United States.

Trees of the Temperate Forest, July 12-17th.
Learn how to recognize 45 species of primary temperate forest trees, learn forest succession principles, and apply skills in interpreting the health and history of any single woodlot. This course will prepare you to recognize approximately 90% of the standing trees in forests located throughout the forest heartland, from Maine to Tennessee.

Forest Waterways, Lifeblood of the Eastern Forest, August 16-21st.
An integrated view of the richest aquatic systems to be found anywhere in the temperate world — the streams and rivers of Eastern United States. Learn the global significance of our rivers’ fresh-water fish, mussels, salamanders, crayfish, and other aquatic wildlife; and their ecological inter-relationships.

Private Forest Landowners Course – Managing for Biodiversity, Sept 18-20th
Learn how to clarify the management goals you hold for your privately-owned forest. Unlike most courses which teach owners how to make financial profit from the timber assets of their forest, this course teaches interested owners how to sustainably manage a forest for the primary purpose of restoring high biodiversity of native plants and wildlife.

2010 and beyond:

Forests of the Far South – Exploring the Wilderness of Florida’s Panhandle

Forests of the Far North – Forests of the Boundary Waters of Minnesota

Forests of the Heartland – The Mother Forest of the Southern Appalachians

Spring Ephemerals – Wildflowers of the Eastern Forest

Interpreting our Eastern Forest Heritage – Training for Teacher Naturalists

For more information on the non-profit Appalachian Forest School, see www.highlandssanctuary.org/WE/AFS.htm
For recent copies of Nature Notes from the Eastern Forest, click here: www.highlandssanctuary.org/naturenotes.backlist.htm

Description of Sponsor:

The Arc of Appalachia Preserve System is an educational non-profit organization that operates 12 preserves and stewards a total of 3000 acres in rural southern Ohio for the purpose of forest biodiversity preservation. The Arc of Appalachia operates visitor education and hiking trails at the Appalachian Forest Museum, featuring dramatic educational murals that interpret the global significance of the temperate broadleaf forest. The Appalachian Forest Museum is located in its headquarters, the Highlands Nature Sanctuary, in Bainbridge, OH, 45612. The Arc of Appalachia also sponsors The Appalachian Forest School, offering adult courses that advance temperate forest education and conservation among Eastern citizens.

 

Volunteers Needed for Watershed Stewardship

From a National Park Service Press Release:

In celebration of the “Year of the River,” the National Park Service is launching a new Volunteers-in-Parks (VIP) opportunity – Watershed Steward to celebrate the recovery of the Cuyahoga River.

The stewardship of Cuyahoga Valley National Park (CVNP) resources is a shared responsibility because many of the resources the park protects extend beyond the jurisdictional boundaries. Land-use decisions made by 46 local communities in the park’s watersheds affect downstream park resources. Increased flooding, degraded water quality, and poor stream health can result from changes in park watersheds.
Watershed Stewards will help promote watershed stewardship principles by regularly attending and participating in their community’s monthly public decision-making meetings and, as they become more comfortable with the content, to engage in watershed policy discussions. Stewards will receive educational opportunities and reference materials on key aspects of watershed policy. Stewards will also be encouraged to participate in local watershed activities in their communities. Our goal is to supplement and enhance existing watershed protection efforts in order to better preserve downstream park resources. Stewards are expected to volunteer from four to six evening hours a month.

An informational meeting will be held at 6:30 p.m. on Thursday, March 26 at Happy Days Lodge, located at 500 West Streetsboro Road (SR 303), Peninsula. Attendance is not required to apply.

Visit the National Park Service’s web site for an application and program details, and to read more about the Cuyahoga River Watershed. For more information contact Kevin Skerl at 330-650-5071 ext. 4. or kevin_skerl@nps.gov.

 

Avon Lake Power Plant Field Trip

Northeast Ohio Nature: Avon Lake Power Plant Field Trip

The blackbrook Audubon Society had a field trip to Lake Erie last week where they saw Glaucous gull, Greater Backed gulls, Redhead ducks, Common Mergansers, Common Goldeneye and Bufflehead ducks. Check out their blog posting and photos of the trip.

Blackbrook Audubon Society promotes conservation and restoration of ecosystems with emphasis on birds and habitat through education and advocacy within Ohio’s Lake, Geauga, Ashtabula counties and adjacent communities. Lord knows we could use more of that!

If you ever have a chance to attend an event like this, even if you don’t know birds well, it is a real treat. Their next event is SUNDAY, MARCH 15th, 2009, when Blackbrook Audubon will visit Sheldon’s Marsh in Huron Ohio. You can learn more by going to their web page.

 

2009 Stewardship Network Conference

2009 Stewardship Network Conference – The Stewardship Network: "land managers, researchers, volunteers, private contractors, ecologists, homeowners, restorationists, students, outdoor enthusiasists, nonprofit staff and volunteers, and nature lovers of all kinds…" will gather for the for 2009 conference, Practice, & Art of Restoring Native Ecosystems conference."

What a great way to learn more about the care and feeding of nature. It looks like this will be a very exciting and informative gathering.