Malabar’s “Farm Fun Day” – Barn Dance

As one of many events planned at Malabar Farm State Park, Fun on the Farm is the theme of this event. Some of the activities scheduled for the morning activities include: Egg and Spoon Race(five eggs have to be picked up and carried in a small basket over the finish line); Lasso the Steer; Get Dressed for Work (contestants must run to put on bib overalls, a coat, hat, gloves, and boots, then run to the finish line); Fix the Machinery (a container holds the right bolts to fit several holes in a steel plate, mixed in with an odd assortment of other nuts and bolts); Watermelon Seed Spitting Contest; Rubber Chicken Toss; a Sack Race and more. Additional competitions include A Pie Eating Contest (Noon) (chocolate or banana cream), Sidewalk Art and a Fishing Derby.

Instructions & Time Line

August 1, 2009

GAMES, SIDE WALK ART & PIE EATING CONTEST

  • 10AM – 10:30AM: Morning Registration
    Note: (Register for games, sidewalk art, pie eating contest. Pick up your game completion.)
  • 10:30AM to 11:45PM: Morning Farm Games (Must be registered.See list of games below))
  • 10:30AM to 11:45PM: Sidewalk Art (Must be registered)
  • 12PM: Pie Eating Contest (Open to first 20. Register during "Morning Registration")
  • 12:15PM: Pie Eating Contest Awards
  • 12:15PM: Contest Certificates

Note: Must complete all "Farm Contest" from 10:30AM to 11:45PM. You will receive a card at registration and will receive a check with the completion of every game.

FISHING DERBY

  • 12:30PM: Fishing Derby Registration
  • 1:00PM: Fishing Derby Begins
  • 2:00PM: Fishing Derby Ends
  • 2:10PM: Fishing Awards

MORNING GAMES INCLUDE:

  • Walnut Pickup
  • Dress like A Farmer (Get Dressed For Work)
  • Sack Race
  • Cow Pie Toss
  • Rubber Chicken Toss
  • Egg Spoon Race
  • Watermelon Seed Spitting Contest
  • Fish In A Bucket
  • Lasso A Steer
  • Horse Shoes
  • Fix The Machinery

RULES & IMPORTANT INFORMATION

  1. An adult should accompany children.
  2. All activities are open to the public free of charge.
  3. Certificates of completion will be awarded. It’s all for fun!!!!!
  4. Game completion certificates will be presented at the rear porch area at the Visitor Center.
  5. Limited poles, wheel chair access dock, and bait will be available for youth under 16 years of age.
  6. If you have your own fishing pole please bring it with you!
  7. Ohio Division of Wildlife will be stocking the ponds with fish for the event.
  8. Fishing Derby prizes awarded at 2:15PM are for most fish caught & largest fish caught.

BARN DANCE

Additionally, Malabar Farm will host a Summer Square Dance at the main barn beside the Big House. The dance will be held on Saturday from 7:00 p.m. to 10:00 p.m. The barn dance is sponsored by the Loudonville FFA Alumni. This old-fashioned square dance will take you back to the days when people gathered to celebrate summer with their friends and neighbors. Live music will be featured along with square dance calling. This dance is open to the public at no charge and refreshments will be available.

SPECIAL ACCOMMODATIONS FOR THE EVENT

The Malabar Farm Restaurant newly renovated will be open on Saturdays 11:00 a.m. to 9:00 p.m.; Sundays 11:00 a.m. to 7:00 p.m.; Tuesdays through Fridays 11:00 a.m. through 8:00 p.m. For reservations or more information call 419-938-5205. The Malabar Farm Market, located next to the Restaurant will be open summer and fall featuring locally-grown produce.

Additionally, overnight accommodations are available at Malabar Farm Hostelling International. The Hostel is a restored 1919 historic mail order catalog home where the Bromfield family lived from 1939-1940. Rates start at $20.00 per person. Call 419-892-2055 for reservations at the Hostel or visit the Hostel sub-page at malabarfarm.org.

 

Don't Drink the Water…

Occurrence of Organic Wastewater Compounds in three tributaries to the Cuyahoga River: “a total of 12 antibiotic, 20 pharmaceutical, 41 wastewater, and 22 hydrophobic compounds were detected in water.”
This new government report on the contents of our water is disturbing to me. Not because we don’t already have a growing awareness that Pharmaceuticals and Personal Care Products (PPCPs) are in our natural water courses. The reason it is disturbing to me is the extensive list of chemicals listed in this report.

In spite of the fact that over the last 40 years we have made great strides in reducing bacterial loads and known toxic chemicals from our water, our streams are still cocktails of antibiotics, birth control hormones, caffeine, and dozens of other chemicals. While the EPA says there is no known human health effects of PPCPs in the environment, the fact is we don’t know. Meanwhile, fish, aquatic plants, and wildlife (people?) that eat fish are getting low level, long term doses of a whole host of chemicals.

This report is about just a few small tributaries to the Cuyahoga, but this issue is relevant everywhere people live in high numbers. How many anti-biotic resistant strains of bacteria can develop in such environments? What happens to people who eat fish that take in birth control hormones from the water they live in?

The answer? We do not know. This is a very serious issue that needs to be addressed by a combination of education, regulation, and better scientific research.

For more information about PPCPs, visit the EPA’s web page.

 

Time for steelhead fishing to begin for the fall.

Soon, cooler temperatures and perfect water levels will signal the ideal time for steelhead fishing around northeast Ohio. Steelhead fishing is great on Conneaut Creek, the Ashtabula River, the Grand River, the Chagrin River, Rocky River, Vermilion River, and even spots on the Cuyahoga. This challenging outdoor pursuit is not for the faint-hearted. Cold rushing water, cold air, and feisty fish make steelhead fishing strenuous, so be careful.

To learn more check out the Ohio Central Basin Steelheaders web site. If you are so inclined, join the group. Their President, Joe Moravec and the rest of the Central Basin Steelheaders care about nature and conservation and our northeast Ohio environment. Their club shows it by participating in and leading a number of efforts at education throughout the year, as well as supporting conservation groups in the area.

Check out this article in the Plain Dealer for yet more information: Cooler weather brings steelhead – Cleveland.com: